Politics

When Will Congress Act on Climate Change?

I hear a lot of different answers to that question, ranging from “soon” to “never.”  I thought it would be interesting to see what our readers think about this. [polldaddy poll=1457402]

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Another one bites the dust (RIP Cannon nomination)

Ann touted the nomination of Jon Cannon to be EPA Deputy Administrator here as “a great appointment,” but last week he became the most recent Obama nominee to fall.  Here’s the WSJ coverage.  His withdrawal is being met with real sadness in many quarters.  At a conference of public and private bar environmental lawyers in Los Angeles on Friday, Cecilia Estolano, CEO of the LA Community …

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Lubchenco on scientific integrity

Shortly after her confirmation as NOAA administrator, Jane Lubchenco sat for an interview (subscription required) with Science and Nature. Asked about her priorities, she listed science at the top (others include ending overfishing, getting NOAA’s satellite program back on track, establishing a National Climate Service, and protecting and restoring ocean ecosystems). When pressed to expand …

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Action on Nano-regulation Likely in California This Year

On March 19, the California Department of Toxic Substances Control (DTSC) hosted its third symposium on nanotechnology.  The symposium featured speakers from industry, government, the NGO community, and academia and focused upon potential regulatory approaches for dealing with health and environmental effects of nanotechnology.  In his remarks, Assemblyperson Mike Feuer announced his intent to introduce …

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The US Chamber of Commerce on Carbon Regulation: Sub-zero stupid

Holly referenced the Chamber of Commerce’s hysterical claim that regulating carbon dioxide would stop all the infrastructure projects in the stimulus.  Not only is that not true, but it might in fact be exactly the opposite. The reason is pretty straightforward: to the extent that the government places caps on carbon dioxide, such a policy …

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Finally

Having finally shaken off the various and sundry anonymous holds that had  been placed on the nominations, the Senate on Thursday confirmed Jane Lubchenco to be the administrator of NOAA and John Holdren to be Director of the Office of Science and Technology Policy.  The Washington Post has a nice article about Lubchenco, why she …

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DiFi defends the Desert Tortoise

As one example of the growing conflict over use of sensitive lands for renewable energy projects (Ann recently blogged about this tension here), check out Sen. Feinstein’s letter to Interior Secretary Ken Salazar asking that the BLM suspend consideration of proposed leases on federal lands near Joshua Tree National Park being considered for solar energy fields.  “While …

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Shouldn’t Conservatives Be Environmentalists?

It seems to me that the answer is yes, contrary to popular opinion.  There are several varieties of conservatism, but in my view each of them should resonate with at least some aspects of environmental protection. Let’s start with social conservatives.  What does it mean to have a “culture of life”?  Shouldn’t it mean objecting …

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Two New EPA Nominees

The President announced two new EPA choices:  Cynthia Giles as chief of enforcement, and   Michele DePass as EPA’s assistant administrator for international affairs. Cynthia Giles is a Berkeley Law grad.    She is currently the vice president and director of the Conservation Law Foundation’s Rhode Island Advocacy Center,  focusing on state and regional programs …

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Interior team slowly takes shape

President Obama and Interior Secretary Salazar have begun to trickle out the new leadership team for the Interior Department. So far, the team is heavy on legal talent. Like Secretary Salazar, the first three nominees to subordinate positions all hold JDs. David Hayes was nominated late last month to be Deputy Secretary, the number two …

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